CFHS Blog

Guest blog – community-led research generates more than research knowledge

Our guest blog is from Lesley Greenaway, a free-lance evaluator and consultant. She has a PhD in Participative Evaluation, and is committed to building capacity for research and evaluation. What is distinct about community-led research is that it includes community members as active participants in the whole research process. This means finding ways to share decision-making in …

Also posted in CFHS updates, News |

New blog post – Pasta with a past: the collective memory and collective consciousness of Scotland’s community food initiatives

A government policy document a few years ago noted that, “Scotland has both a remarkable legacy as well as an admirable current resource in its social enterprises, community and voluntary sector.” Why? No-one likes to reinvent the wheel, be told by another project after hitting a snag that they could have told them where the …

Also posted in CFHS updates, News |

Our latest blog: Social media. What is it good for?

Here at CFHS we like to reach out to you in different ways. We have a hard copy newsletter for those of you who like to share or read on the train. Our e-bulletin suits those who like the convenience of news delivered straight to their inbox. Our website holds a wealth of information for …

Also posted in CFHS updates, News |

CFHS blog – from the reading pile …

Part of our role is to share evidence, learning and knowledge, so a few of my reflections on a little something from my reading pile. This week I read a briefing paper published by Glasgow Centre for Population Health, setting out principles for effective social regeneration and interventions.  It is based on the work of …

Also posted in CFHS updates, From the reading pile ... | Area of Work: |

Cooking skills blog 33: Working with vulnerable groups: Supporting people affected by food insecurity: ideas from practitioners

Last year, Katy Gordon, a PhD student took part in an internship within CFHS. Katy ran an online survey and interviewed practitioners to find out how they supported people experiencing food insecurity on their cooking skills courses. Her full report ‘Just getting on with it’ is now available.  Meanwhile here are few examples of activities they …

Also posted in CFHS updates, Recruiting and working with vulnerable groups | Areas of Work: , |

Cooking skills blog 32: Practitioner guest blog: ‘the benefits of being forgetful and burning rice’

Chris Mantle ANutr, Senior Food and Health Development Worker, is our guest blogger this week. Chris is a member of our cooking skills study group and runs regular cooking courses for Edinburgh Community Food. Chris gives his thoughts on the benefits of not always being the perfect cook when running community cooking courses. ‘Having grown up – essentially …

Also posted in CFHS updates, ​Ideas about developing and running cooking skills courses | Area of Work: |

Cooking skills blog 31: Cooking course resources: updates from REHIS

Yesterday I attended the Royal Environmental Health Institute of Scotland (REHIS) seminar for practitioners who run the REHIS accredited Elementary Cooking skills course and other REHIS food and health courses. REHIS, Obesity Action Scotland, Food Standards Scotland and I, provided updates on resources and information around food and health and/ or training. Updates included: Planned …

Also posted in CFHS updates, Cooking course resources |

Cooking skills blog 30: What are the best recipes to use on a cooking skills course? Part 2.

All the practitioners in our cooking skills study group hope that people on their courses will make the recipes they have learned on the course again at home. Most are encouraging course participants to choose the recipes for some, or all of the course sessions, and I have already written a post (see blog 14) …

Also posted in CFHS updates, ​Ideas about developing and running cooking skills courses | Area of Work: |

Cooking skills blog 29: Finding out if your cooking skills courses are ‘working’: Guest blog: what’s the difference between ‘observation’ and ‘third party’?

All members of our cooking skills study group are aiming to use a combination of three different evaluation sources to find out if their courses are ‘working’, by sourcing evaluation materials from 1) the course practitioner (as an ‘observer’), 2) the participant (‘self-reporting’) and 3) and a third source such as a ‘third party’ who …

Also posted in CFHS updates, Finding out if your cooking skills courses are working | Area of Work: |

Cooking skills blog 28: How do cooking course practitioners support people experiencing food insecurity?

Katy Gordon, a PhD student took part in an internship within the CFHS programme late last year. She focused on a project on food insecurity and cooking courses and carried out an online survey and interviewed practitioners from six organisations. Here are the main findings from a report (which will be available in May). Six …

Also posted in CFHS updates, Recruiting and working with vulnerable groups | Areas of Work: , |